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A couple good ah ha moments

...One of the first was accepting the fact that everything can't be taught in one class. There are so many wonderful layers to unfold in a yoga practice, even a lifetime is too short.

Since as both a practitioner and a teacher I have had some pretty profound experiences through yoga, there was this incredible desire to include all these various elements in to my classes in hopes of provoking some equally profound experiences for my students. Although it's important to have an intention walking in to the studio, I feel like I'm beginning to understand that every individual is at a different stage of their journey, and unless they come to me personally to discuss their inquiry, there is no way for me to know exactly how my teaching affects them. I'm simply there to offer my yoga to them, and hope that they keep practicing afterwards, whether it be with me or someone else...

...Something else I discovered shortly after returning home (with a stack of books purchased in Nosara) ... is that there are countless resources available for me to keep reading and learning from, but if I try to take all of them in simultaneously, I can't truly assimilate any of it. The lesson I learned, pick a book, read it, digest it, integrate its lessons into my practice and my teaching, sit with it, let it settle .... and then move on to the next one...

...As I started teaching more (and hearing my voice out loud more), I quickly learned to embrace the silence! No one wants to be squawked at for 90 minutes straight...

...The lesson I am currently digesting revolves around finding the balance between how much I practice vs. how much I teach. As someone who enjoys practicing an average of 5 times a week, I am now finding that my practice is changing as a result of teaching so much. I truly believe that my practice fuels my teaching and for that reason I feel that the teaching does NOT replace the practice; but when I find myself teaching 2 (and occasionally 3) classes in a day, to practice in addition to that doesn't allow for much recovery time. Making sure that between all the teaching and practicing there is appropriate time for recovery, food, rest, etc., is all part of the yoga as well. I'm still figuring out how to make it work. I think a plausible option might be to make one of my practice days a meditation day, and making another morning an SAY self practice instead of my usual vigorous ashtanga vinyasa class. ...Stay tuned. I'm experimenting right now...

...The other thing I'm playing with is how much I demonstrate while I teach ... again to preserve energy; and to avoid injury. All the classes I teach currently are very Yang ... I always start with some SAY or Feldenkrais, moving slowly in the beginning, but in the end, all my classes are quite physical. I'm discovering that demonstrating while teaching is very different to practicing, and making sure that I'm sufficiently warm enough to demonstrate has been on my mind as my body gets more and more tired. I've established a simple ritual that I practice before I step in to the studio in the mind set of the teacher. I hope that by doing this regularly I will avoid throwing myself into a posture mindlessly  ... I guess I do it to remind myself that although I am responsible for the safety of my students, I'm also responsible for my own safety...

 ...Something that pops up from time to time ... Why do some classes I teach feel better than others... more magical?more inspiring? ...Who knows?? ... Just like how some days when I practice I feel stronger than others, I guess...